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Nepal and India allege Siberian migratory birds are 'causing bird flu outbreaks'

By The Siberian Times reporter
25 February 2013

Officials in Nepal and India are alleging birds migrating from Siberia are responsible for cases of bird flu in domestic fowl.

Siberian birds responsible for bird flu, a report by Director at the Department of Livestock Service said. Picture: Alexander Tyryshkin, The Siberian Times 

In Nepal, the Director at the Department of Livestock Service(DoLS), Dr Nar Bahadur Rajwar, claimed the disease has been introduced by some of 800 species that winter in Nepal's national parks and ponds. 

'Ducks are the first victims of flu from the Siberian birds. The disease gradually spreads to other domestic birds,' said a report in the The Himalayan Times.

'However, the wandering birds and ducks are not affected with the bird flu virus... he suggested the farmers not to keep the duck and chicken together.'

The report was headlined: 'Siberian birds responsible for bird flu'.

A day earlier, The Times of India reported from Berhampur that 'bird flu scare came back to roost in the state after a migratory bird in Chilika Lake reportedly tested positive for the dreaded disease. Out of eight samples of migratory birds tested at High Security Animal Disease (HSAD) Laboratory in Bhopal, a northern pintail reportedly tested positive for bird flu.'

Yet migratory birds are not only from Siberia, also flying in from Eurasia, the Capsian region and Kazakhstan.

In December, the sudden death of 38 cranes raised fears of bird flu virus. Two eagles that ate the dead cranes also perished. 

'Cranes migrate to the wetlands in this part of Gujarat from Siberia during the four months of winter,' said a report.

Comments (1)

At the bottom of all the diseases that now threaten humankind is animal agriculture, especially in intensive confinement systems.
http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol13/iss2/art15/
Research, part of Special Feature on Risk mapping for avian influenza: a social-ecological problem
Risk Mapping of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Distribution and Spread
A. Townsend Peterson and Richard A. J. Williams
Kim Bartlett, Clinton WA USA
14/10/2015 17:05
0
0
1

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