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'I've grown fat, got a tan & now look like a Siberian'
Vladimir Lenin, 1897, in Siberian exile

Global warming? Snow falls in Siberia to mark official start of summer

By The Siberian Times reporter
02 June 2016

Freak weather as winter returns to Khanty-Mansi and Yamalo-Nenets autonomous regions.

Residents of Surgut, Noyabrsk, Novy Urengoy and other cities woke on 1 June, the first day of summer, to find it looked more like Chirstmas. Picture: Vita Golovyuk

The Siberian stereotype says its always cold here, but this is a fallacy. Usually. Elsewhere, for example in Chita, the temperature is 24C, and in many regions there are growing risks for forest fires. 

But as these pictures show, in some areas of western Siberia, the thermometers have plunged to around zero. Residents of Surgut, Noyabrsk, Novy Urengoy and other cities woke on 1 June, the first day of summer, to find it looked more like Chirstmas. 

In some areas there were even snow drifts. In Noyabrsk, the local administration restarted heating supplies to homes.

Snow in June


Snow in June


Snow in June


Snow in June


Snow in June


Snow in June

As these pictures show, in some areas of western Siberia, the thermometers have plunged to around zero. Pictures: Linda Simonyan, Liliya Iskacheva, Anastasia Marley, Ksenia Afanasyeva, Natalya Frankevich, @welary88

Linda Simonyan commented: 'The weather decided to congratulate us in this way for the day of  summer.'

Kamilla posted: 'Happy New Year, comrades!'

Liliya Iskacheva wrote: 'Hurray! First summer day!'

Vita Golovyuk said: 'I just cannot help but post this picture! Summer is here and the first summer snow!' 

Comments (6)

I live in the south of Russia, 2,600 km. south-west of Surgut. According to Accu-weather, the forecast shows temperatures about 5 degrees below normal for the whole summer. Not one day between June and September is expected to even reach a normal high temperature.

Bottom line is that the below normal low temperatures are happening right across the largest country in the world and not isolated to one small area.
James, Stavropol, Russia
07/06/2016 14:59
1
0
Yesterday, I read how the sun had no spots. This is very rare. Sunspots are a major factor in generating the solar wind. With reduced solar wind, the amount of cosmic rays penetrating the earth's atmosphere increases significantly. Cosmic rays hit water vapor over the ocean, combining the water molecules into water particles that form clouds, resulting in global cooling and increased cold snaps.

Looks like Siberia and the rest of the world are reflecting the reduced sunspot activity to me with then cooling temperatures.

Here is a link to understanding this relationship: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-m09lKtYT4

Tom
Tom Johnson, Brea, USA
07/06/2016 02:52
1
0
Latest book and documentary.
‘The Deliberate Corruption of Climate Science’.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPzpPXuASY8


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPzpPXuASY8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sO08Hhjes_0
www.drtimball.com
Dr Tim Ball - Historical Climatologist, Victoria BC Canada
03/06/2016 19:34
4
1
friend of mine is EXusa resident now in russia for years, he reckons the way their system runs is excellent heating is provided at minimal cost to everyone utilising whats wasted in our western nations the byproduct heat from power gen and other processing is piped into every building.
their pensioners dont have to burn books or freeze cos theycant pay for heat. at least anywhere thats near central grids.
theres a LOT to like about Russia :-)
Laurel, Australia
03/06/2016 17:28
5
1
John, that's right, the local administrations do this. If the average temperature (in the street) is below 46.4 degrees for 3 days, they must turn on the heat. Those who want additional warmth use electric heaters, but it's rather costly.
Guzel, Russia
03/06/2016 11:26
5
0
I would love an explanation of "the local administration restarted heating supplies to homes." You telling me people are at the mercy of an "administration" when it comes to heating their home? Does this mean a person like me who loves heat and runs it when its gets below 65 degrees, just has to suffer because the "administration" controls the thermostat? I claim complete ignorance on how this works over there and would love to know more.
john, usa
02/06/2016 23:33
4
0
1

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