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Food rescue for rare mountain goats in Altai Mountains

By The Siberian Times reporter
08 December 2015

Exceptionally heavy snow falls lead to hunger and death for hardy animals.

'There is the risk of losing a significant part of the population'. Picture: Saylyugem National Park

Experts say the problem is acute in the upper reaches of the Argut River where snow is lying 40cm to 1 metre deep, preventing the goats forage for food. The goats have started to die in Sailugem National Park.

A food drop is now underway to the hungry animals, supply feed intended for horses to save the animals.

The goats have moved to lower areas but are still thwarted by heavy snow on the ground.

Denis Malikov, deputy director for science at the park, said: 'Given that the winter has only now started and, most likely, there will be more snowfalls, a die-off of mountain goats is possible. There is the risk of losing a significant part of the population.' 

Food rescue for rare mountain goats in Altai Mountains


Food rescue for rare mountain goats in Altai Mountains


Food rescue for rare mountain goats in Altai Mountains


Food rescue for rare mountain goats in Altai Mountains


Food rescue for rare mountain goats in Altai Mountains
A food drop is now underway to the hungry animals. Pictures: Saylyugem National Park


Fierce winters are not rare in the Altai Mountains, but this year's falls of snow are unusual, according to the experts. A research paper by Professor Genrikh Sobansky warned that the goats were hit by not only deep snow, but also avalanches. 

'In winter of 1965-1966, goats in the upper reaches of the Yerinat River were badly affected. A lot of them died then and in other locations of the habitat, particularly, in the basin of the Chulcha River and Kuraysky ridge. Entire groups were dying. 

'The number of animals after that unusually severe and long winter has dropped significantly, in some locations they died off entirely.'

Comments (3)

I have to disagree with Enrique's comment "better let nature take it's course" The other species that have the misfortune to share this planet with us need all the help they can get. If humans weren't polluting the world with GMOs, chemical toxins of every sort, plastic and all sorts of other rubbish, not to mention our overpopulation depleting all resources then I'm sure other species are perfectly capable of surviving harsh weather. But unfortunately we don't and we're rapidly pushing everything to the edge.
CAROLINE LEA, SCOTLAND
15/12/2015 22:09
1
0
Better help those animals to survive! Nowadays keeping the biodiversity of the planet is a key responsibility of humans.

Nature just got superseded when humans destroyed most of the habitats of the planet.
Andres, Cancun, Mexico
13/12/2015 09:30
3
0
Better let nature take its course.
Enrique, Spain
11/12/2015 05:01
0
5
1

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